Faith Imitates Art

It is difficult to pinpoint what it is exactly that makes our spirits respond in a raw and instinctive way to the arts. Perhaps it is because engaging the arts reminds us that we are made in the image of a divine artist, a God who colored the sky and the flowers; who delights in trees that are pleasing to the eye; who specifically requested “Bezalel … to devise artistic designs” in Exodus 35; who requested that the tabernacle curtains be made of “fine twined linen and blue and purple and scarlet yarns, with cherubim skillfully worked” (Exodus 36:8); not to mention the breathtakingly beautiful detailed tailoring of the priestly vestments in Exodus 39.


The arts not only remind us that we are made in the image of a creator but they invite us to ponder the age-old theological and philosophical understanding that beauty, goodness and truth are inextricably linked with the things of the spirit and the nature of God.

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Why Beauty Points Us Towards The Existence Of God

Moreover, when I describe something as ‘beautiful’, I do so because I believe you should find it beautiful too. There is something about aesthetic claims which almost demand universality. Why else is their controversy when modern artists who present abstract junk in the Tate Modern? It is because we regard their claim that their artwork is beautiful as degenerate nonsense which is nothing less than sacrilege and a stain on real beauty… beauty that is unified, orderly and mystical, rather than chaotic, random and depressing. Beauty is objective, it is not ‘in the eye of the beholder’. Claims on what is beautiful concern us just as claims on what is good concern us, it matters when someone is mistaken on what they believe is good and similarly on what they believe is beautiful. (Link to Article)

By Him All Things Were Created

Here’s an interesting 3 minutes clip that shows the Mind behind all that we see in life.

Colossians 1:16-17 (KJV) For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.

“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul, and paints his own nature into his pictures.” — Henry Ward Beecher [1813-87]

“So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them.” (Genesis 1:27)

How True Art Points to God

Making Worthless Things Valuable (John MacArthur)

“The names of the twelve apostles are these: The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; and James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax-gatherer; James the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus; Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot, the one who betrayed Him” (Matt. 10:2-4).

In God’s hands you can be a precious and effective instrument.

The story is told of a great concert violinist who wanted to prove a point, so he rented a music hall and announced that he would play a concert on a $20,000 violin. On concert night the music hall was filled to capacity with music lovers anxious to hear such an expensive instrument played. The violinist stepped onto the stage, gave an exquisite performance, and received a thunderous standing ovation. When the applause subsided, he suddenly threw the violin to the ground, stomped it to pieces, and walked off the stage. The audience gasped, then sat in stunned silence.

Within seconds the stage manager approached the microphone and said, “Ladies and gentlemen, to put you at ease, the violin that was just destroyed was a $20 violin. The master will now return to play the remainder of his concert on the $20,000 instrument.” At the conclusion of his concert he received another standing ovation. Few people could tell the difference between the two violins. His point was obvious: it isn’t the violin that makes the music; it’s the violinist.

The disciples were like $20 violins that Jesus transformed into priceless instruments for His glory. I trust you’ve been encouraged to see how God used them despite their weakness, and I pray you’ve been challenged by their strengths. You may not be dynamic like Peter or zealous like James and Simon, but you can be faithful like Andrew and courageous like Thaddaeus. Remember, God will take the raw material of your life and expose you to the experiences and teachings that will shape you into the servant He wants you to be.

Trust Him to complete what He has begun in you, and commit each day to the goal of becoming a more qualified and effective disciple.

What ‘Abstract’ Teaches Us About God’s Intention for Design and Art

Netflix’s illuminating new series, Abstract: The Art of Design, documents the lives, designs and dreams of the some of the great innovators of our time—from graphic artists to automotive designers, illustrators to interior designers. The first season is available to stream, and you absolutely should.

Each breath-taking, provocative and intentional piece of work featured in the series showcases the depth and diversity of human creativity at its finest. Where Abstract shines most, however, is in its ability to pose deeper questions about the metaphysical functions of design, art and beauty—which, as theologian John de Gruchy writes in Christianity, Art and Transformation, “characterizes the form of ultimate reality … the essence of God’s glory.”

Here are eight major takeaways about God’s intention for art and design from Abstract’s featured artists and designers: (Read more)

You can’t make sense of the way a thing [is] without understanding what it’s [for]

A friend of mine has an interesting spoon. (Bear with me.) Its slightly larger than a teaspoon and has a large hole in the middle, making it incapable of holding—let alone carrying—the sort of substance that typically requires a spoon. My friend keeps it in his sugar bowl, waiting for unsuspecting guests to attempt productive engagement with it. Some will quietly (but unsuccessfully) persevere with it, not wanting to make a fuss and assuming the fault must somehow lie with them. Others will immediately declare the spoon is ridiculous and insist on something better suited to the task at hand.

The spoon, it turns out, is actually an olive spoon. The hole in the middle is to drain the fluid as you lift the olive to your mouth. And so the lesson for us is this: You can’t make sense of the way the spoon [is] without understanding what it’s [for]. (Read more)

Kid’s Art and the Glory of God

As a Father of a couple of kids 6 and under I am frequently given gifts. These gifts are precious and priceless works of art. My children will spend significant time to go and get their paper and crayons to make me a picture. Then they run to me with the picture in hand and simply say, “Here Daddy, I made this.” I hold it up and admire it. Often I will ask questions and they answer in surprising detail about their intentions with their marks. There is no question: they made this artwork with intentionality. They want to share it with me.

I have been studying the book of Genesis lately and was struck with the parallel in creation. The Bible repeatedly says in chapter 1 that what God made was good. God looks at what he made with approval. It is good. He also wants to share its goodness. Psalm 19 tells us that the creation declares God’s glory. It is pouring forth speech about him as the glorious Creator of everything. (Read more)

The Beginning of Wisdom

With all of this experience as a backdrop, let me ask you a couple of questions. If I can’t expect my children to create masterpieces on canvas when they do not know and submit to the rules and principles of oil painting, how can we expect to make masterpieces of our lives without knowing and submitting to the laws and principles of life? If I can’t expect my mechanic to make wise decisions about the maintenance of my car without first knowing how the car works, how can I expect to make wise decisions about my family and finances without first knowing the laws and principles that govern these important arenas of life?

Let me take it one excruciating step further. How do you expect to make a masterpiece of your life if you are unwilling to surrender to the Author of life—the One who knows which textures and colors are best blended for the outcome you desire? How do you expect to make wise decisions regarding your family, marriage/love life, and career if you are not willing to submit to the promptings of the One who knows more about those things than you or I ever will? (Read more)

10 Things You Should Know about the Imagination

A Biblical view of imagination:

1. Everyone has an imagination.

The imagination is not simply the province of artists and children, sci-fi buffs and gamers. It is simply the ability of the mind to think in pictures. We use our imaginations all the time, whether we are daydreaming, planning, remembering, or meditating.

2. Imagination is an important power of the human mind.

Imagination is a facet of the mind along with reason, emotions, and the will. Memory employs the imagination so that we can recall events of the past. Imagination also allows us to contemplate our lives in the present. It also empowers us to visualize the future, which is necessary for planning and decision-making.

The creative imagination—the ability to conceive of something that does not already exist—is the source of art and invention. Imagination makes reading possible, as what the author imagines, whether a story or an argument, is replayed in the reader’s mind. (Read more)

The Way Out of “Burnout”

I’m sure most women know what I mean by the phrase burned out. Burnout is what happens to us when we take on too much, and we simply hit the wall. Those duties you once enjoyed have piled up way too high, and now you don’t feel like carrying them anymore. They are heavy. They are hard. They are too many. And you are tired. The duties themselves have not changed — you have.

The commitments and responsibilities are probably very good. Maybe you have been volunteering, teaching, homeschooling, counseling, hosting, helping, cooking, nursing, cleaning, organizing, car pooling, and then you are doing it all over again day after day. You can’t see an end in sight and you feel absolutely fried. Spent. Worn out. Drained. I want to throw you a rope and haul you in out of the water and back on board. (Read more)

“What is the difference between a talent and a spiritual gift?”

There are similarities and differences between talents and spiritual gifts. Both are gifts from God. Both grow in effectiveness with use. Both are intended to be used on behalf of others, not for selfish purposes. First Corinthians 12:7 states that spiritual gifts are given to benefit others and not ourselves. As the two great commandments deal with loving God and others, it follows that one should use his talents for those purposes. But to whom and when talents and spiritual gifts are given differs. A person (regardless of his belief in God or in Christ) is given a natural talent as a result of a combination of genetics (some have natural ability in music, art, or mathematics) and surroundings (growing up in a musical family will aid one in developing a talent for music), or because God desired to endow certain individuals with certain talents (for example, Bezalel in Exodus 31:1-6). Spiritual gifts are given to all believers by the Holy Spirit (Romans 12:3, 6) at the time they place their faith in Christ for the forgiveness of their sins. At that moment, the Holy Spirit gives to the new believer the spiritual gift(s) He desires the believer to have (1 Corinthians 12:11). (Read more)

The importance of making plans

There’s something us modellers can learn from this:

Suppose the thought enters your mind that you want to build a house. You sit down and make a list of all the materials you think you will need. Then you order them to be delivered to the lot where you will build. Everything is piled in the center of the lot, and the next day the bulldozer comes to excavate the basement and everything is in the way. It’s all just where he has to dig.

Why? A failure to plan.

Without some rudimentary planning you probably won’t have anything to eat when you get up in the morning. And without some detailed planning no one can build a house, let alone a skyscraper or shopping mall or city. If producing shelter and food and clothing and transportation is valuable, then planning is valuable. Nothing but the simplest impulses gets accomplished without some forethought which we call a plan. (Link to Article)

How True Art Points to God

The center of reality is a God who is Creator. And since we are made in His image (Genesis 1), we too are creators, able to harness the necessary and practical aspects to make something into something new. In creating good art, we are allowed to mimic the one who created all things—the One who built a universe and said “it is good.” So we create because we were created. As Madeleine L’Engle says, “All true art is incarnational, and therefore ‘religious.’” (Link to Article)

“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul, and paints his own nature into his pictures.” — Henry Ward Beecher [1813-87]

“So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them.” (Genesis 1:27)

3 Ways Movies Are Searching for the Gospel

When I say movies are searching for the gospel, I don’t mean the [content] of the gospel, but more the [shape] of the gospel. Movies tap into our deepest emotions because they draw on truths and realities that only make sense in light of the gospel, and the questions they ask are only resolved in the gospel. (Read more)

When Comparing Yourself Is a Good Thing

Every one of the articles I read talked about comparison as if it were the worst thing you could ever do. Quotes were pulled from famous men and women alike. “Comparison kills.” “To compare is to despair.” “Comparison is the thief of joy.” And, yes, comparing our lives to others has lots of negative aspects to it, and we certainly shouldn’t always be measuring our accomplishments against everyone around us. But sometimes, it seems to me, comparing our lives to others—in balance, of course—can help us. (Read more)

Four Productivity Lies

A look at productivity from a biblical perspective.

I have invested a lot of effort in understanding productivity and emphasizing it in my life. Eventually I came to peace with it. But I only did so after addressing some of the prevailing lies about it. (Read more)